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Russia, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe: U.S. government records

Confidential U.S. State Department central files. Poland, 1945-1949 [microform]: internal affairs, decimal number 860C and foreign affairs, decimal numbers 760C and 711.60C
Microfilm 10578
29 reels
Printed guide: Firestone Microforms DK4429 .C663
Originals held by National Archives as part of Record Group 59, General Records of the Dept. of State. See http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/059.html

Confidential U.S. State Department central files. Poland, 1950-1954 [microform]: internal affairs, decimal numbers 748, 848, and 948 and foreign affairs, decimal numbers 648 and 611.48 /
Microfilm 10577
17 reels
Printed guide: Firestone Microforms DK4429 .C664
Originals held by National Archives as part of Record Group 59, General Records of the Dept. of State. See http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/059.html

Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of ...
Available through interlibrary loan from the Center for Research Libraries.

  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Austria-Hungary and Austria, 1910-1954
  • Records of the U.S. Department of State relating to the internal affairs of Bulgaria, 1910-1954
  • Records of the U.S. Department of State relating to the internal affairs of Czechoslovakia, 1910-1954
  • Records of the U.S. Department of State relating to the internal affairs of Greece, 1910-1954
  • Records of the U.S. Department of State relating to the internal affairs of Hungary, 1930-1959
  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Latvia, 1910-1944
  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Lithuania, 1910-1944
  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Poland, 1916-1944
  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Romania, 1910-1954
  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Russia and the Soviet Union, 1910-44
  • Confidential U.S. State Department central files. The Soviet Union, internal affairs, 1945-1954
  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Serbia and to political relations between the United States and Serbia, 1910-1929
  • Records of the Department of State relating to political relations of Turkey, Greece and the Balkan states, 1930-1939
  • Records of the Department of State relating to the internal affairs of the Ukraine, 1918-1949
  • Records of the Department of State relating to internal affairs of Yugoslavia, 1910-1954

Czechoslovakia from Liberation to Communist State, 1945-63: Records of the U.S. State Department Classified Files Archives Unbound
"This collection documents the creation of the Third Republic, which was established after World War II, and differed markedly from the First Republic of 1918. The Third Republic was created as a result of a compromise between pre-war Czechoslovak Republic leaders and the Czech Communist Party (KSC). The Republic’s hopes were subverted by the KSC, which at the time had considerable popular support and the backing of the Soviet Union."

Socialism and National Unity in Yugoslavia, 1945-63: Records of the U.S. State Department Classified Files Archives Unbound "During World War II, Yugoslavia was divided between the Axis powers and their allies. Royal army soldiers, calling themselves Cetnici (Chetniks), formed a Serbian resistance movement, but a more determined communist resistance under the Partisans, with Soviet and Anglo-American help, liberated all of Yugoslavia by 1944. In an effort to avoid Serbian domination during the post-war years, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, and Montenegro were given separate and equal republican status within the new socialist federation of Yugoslavia; Kosovo and Vojvodina were made autonomous provinces within Yugoslavia. Despite the attempts at a federal system of government for Yugoslavia, Serbia played the leading role in Yugoslavia’s political life for the next 4 decades. Yugoslavia remained independent of the U.S.S.R., as Tito broke with Stalin and asserted Yugoslav independence. Tito went on to control Yugoslavia for 35 years. Under communist rule, Yugoslavia was transformed from an agrarian to an industrial society.  Source Note: RG 59, Records of the Department of State, Central Classified Files, Decimal Files (1945-1949)760H and 860H; (1950-1959)768, 868, 968; (1960-1963)768, 868, 968."

Periodicals & pamphlets

Yugoslavia [microform]: peoples, states and society: socio-political and historical pamphlets of the 19th & 20th centuries from the collection of the UCLA Library
Microfilm 10596
109 reels
Printed guide: Firestone Microforms Z2956 .C65 1996
A collection of pamphlets and short monographs, mostly printed in the 20th century. In Serbocroation and other languages. The guide includes author, title and subject indexes.