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Near East Collections: Jewish Studies Resources at Princeton University and Beyond: RELIGIOUS STUDIES

This guide will introduce you to the multi-faceted discipline known as Jewish Studies and a few of its related fields. The guide also includes information on collections and links to resources found here at Princeton University and beyond.

TORAH (PENTATEUCH)

The first five books of the Hebrew Bible are known as the Torah, the Five Books of Moses, and also as the Pentateuch, from the Greek pentateuchos, meaning five scrolls. Traditional Judaism refers to it as the ḥummash, another form of the number five. The Torah is one of the three divisions of the TANAKH (Heb. תַּנַ״ךְ) - the usual Hebrew collective term for the Old Testament.

-Encyclopaedia Judaica (see Pentateuch)

NEVI'IM (PROPHETS)

Nevi'im (Prophets) is one of the three divisions of the TANAKH (Heb. תַּנַ״ךְ) - the usual Hebrew collective term for the Old Testament.  This threefold division of the Bible is commonly found in the Talmud (e.g., Shab. 88a; Sanh. 101a; Kid. 49a; MK 21a), and arguments are often supported by quoting individual verses from each of the sections (e.g., Meg. 31a; Mak. 10b).

-Encyclpaedia Judaica (see Tanakh)

KETUVIM (HAGIOGRAPHA)

Ketuvim (Hagiographa) is one of the three divisions of the TANAKH (Heb. תַּנַ״ךְ) - the usual Hebrew collective term for the Old Testament.  This threefold division of the Bible is commonly found in the Talmud (e.g., Shab. 88a; Sanh. 101a; Kid. 49a; MK 21a), and arguments are often supported by quoting individual verses from each of the sections (e.g., Meg. 31a; Mak. 10b).

-Encyclpaedia Judaica (see Tanakh)

TALMUD - BABYLONIAN

A literary work of monumental proportions (5,894 folio pages in the standard printed editions), which draws upon the totality of the spiritual, intellectual, ethical, historical, and legal traditions produced in rabbinic circles from the time of the destruction of the Second Temple in the first century until the Muslim conquest at the beginning of the seventh century. The Babylonian Talmud (Bavli) is often described as being a commentary to the Mishnah of Rabbi Judah ha-Nasi, but the actual relationship between these two works is far more complex.

-Encyclopaedia Judaica (see Talmud, Babylonian)

TALMUD - JERUSALEM

Also called the Babylonian Talmud, Talmud di-Venei Ma'arava (The Talmud of the West), or Talmud de-Ere Yisrael.  Like its better known "eastern" counterpart – the Babylonian Talmud (Bavli) – the Yerushalmi is an extensive literary work consisting of both halakhah and aggadah, built upon the foundation, and in the order, of the Mishnah of Rabbi Judah ha-Nasi.

-Encyclopaedia Judaica (see Talmud, Jerusalem)