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WRI 128/129: Being and Becoming

Locating the Scholarly Conversation

To be part of a scholarly conversation, you first have to find the conversation you want to be a part of. Below you will find two strategies for locating a scholarly conversation. 

Keyword Searching

 


Keyword Searching is a way to locate the scholarly conversation by using keywords from your topic to search for material.


There are many places to use keyword searching: 

Library Catalog

  • Searches books, journals, videos, manuscripts, musical scores, visual materials, audio files

Databases

Google Scholar

  • Good for finding the full text of an article or just exploring what might be available on your topic. 
  • WARNING: Google Scholar does not limit to peer-review. Proceed with caution!

Citation Chaining


Citation Chaining is a strategy that uses an article that you already have as bait to lead you to related material.


Option 1: Citation Chaining in Scopus 

1. Go to Scopus.

2. Copy and paste the title of your article in the search bar.

3. From the drop-down menu to the right of the search file, select Article Title

4. Click Search.

5. Locate your article and click on the title

a. Scroll down to see a list of References. These are representative of the scholarly conversation that came before the article was published.

b. In the right-hand column, look for Cited by X documents. These are articles that built upon the ideas presented in your starting article. For this list, we can see how the conversation has evolved and expanded. 

c. In the right-hand column, look for Related documents. These are articles that share keywords with your starting article. Sometimes these are not a perfect fit, but you might find something you otherwise might have overlooked. 

d. Click on the Author. Scroll down to see if the authors have published anything else relating to your topic. 


Option 2: Citation Chaining in Google Scholar

1. Go to Google Scholar.

2. Copy and paste the title of your article in the search bar.

3. Click Search.

4. Locate your article.

a. Under the search result for your article, click the Cited by These are articles that built upon the ideas presented in your starting article. For this list, we can see how the conversation has evolved and expanded. This list will include peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed articles as well as books.