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ORCiD and SciENcv

Frequently Asked Questions by Administrative Staff

Don't see your question? Email prds@princeton.edu

 

Q: What is ORCiD?

A: ORCID, Open Research and Contributor ID, is a non-profit organization that promotes the use of a unique digital identifier in an effort to help link researchers to their scholarly works regardless of institutional affiliation, moves or names. This is as per NSPM 33, whose objective to direct  that “research funding agencies shall require the disclosure of information related to potential conflicts of interest and commitment from participants in the Federally funded R&D enterprise”

 

Q: What is SciENcv?

A: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv) is an electronic system available through the NIH National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Researchers can use SciENcv to create and maintain biosketches for federal grant  grant applications and annual reports. Current agencies that accept  documents from this SciENcv include NIH, NSF, DOE and more to come. SciENcv pulls information from other systems, including ORCID, Research.gov and eRA commons in order to ease administrative burden and allow researchers to quickly create and recreate a biosketch for each grant application or annual report as required by federal regulations.

 

Q: What is the difference between SciENcv and ORCiD?

A: SciENcv and ORCiD are two distinct tools that can be used together to facilitate the creation of biosketches. SciENcv is a web based tool that helps researchers assemble a CV that complies with sponsor requirements. SciENcv will produce biosketches that are in funder approved formats.

ORCiD essentially acts as a an identity management tool  that provides a persistent, unique identifier and a method of linking research related products such as publications and datasets to a researcher identifier. You can transfer information from ORCiD into SciENcv and use these two systems together to streamline the process of creating biosketches.

 

Q: When I first ask researchers to start using ORCiD and SciENcv, what information do I need to provide to them?

A: ORCiD is a repository for publications which can be linked to SciENcv, where your appointments and current and pending information can be manually tracked. The benefit to using these systems is that when you submit a proposal in the future, we would have the ability to quickly and easily print a funding-agency compliant biosketch and current and pending within minutes. Access to the systems can be delegated to anyone you wish on your behalf, for set-up and maintenance purposes. Additionally, with the numerous recent changes to the formatting requirements of these documents by many of our federal funding agencies, we expect that at some point the use of SciENcv may become mandated, and we would like to be prepared. At this time, Princeton University is making a push via grants managers and faculty assistants for research-active faculty to embrace and support the use of these systems, as this will likely be mandated by major sponsors in the not too distant future.

  • We can provide an email template upon request.

 

Q: What resources are available to get started with ORCiD and SciENcv? See links below.

ORCiD

SciENcv

 

Q: As a grants manager or faculty assistant, do you do you need to have an ORCiD or SciENcv account?

A: Yes, you cannot be made a delegate without your own ORCiD and SciENcv accounts.

 

Q: Are there instructions on how to add ORCiD and SciENcv delegates that we can provide to researchers?

A: See https://researchdata.princeton.edu/research-lifecycle-guide/sciencv-biosketches-and-orcid-id#Delegate+Access for instructions with images.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEND A DELEGATE REQUEST:

1. Log in to your My NCBI account

2. Select your username in the top-right corner of the screen to access the Account Settings page

3. Under “Delegates,” select “Add a delegate”

4. Enter your delegate’s email address and select "OK"

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ACCEPT A DELEGATE REQUEST:

1. Log in to your My NCBI account

2. Check your email for the delegate request. If you haven’t received the request email, be sure to check you spam folder – the email comes from myncbi@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

3. Use the link in the delegate request email to accept and confirm the delegation

 

Q: Is there any special instruction or guidance on how to create my ORCiD and SciENcv accounts?

A: See the Library’s ORCID guide for more detailed information about ORCID and how to create and manage your ORCID account. Instructions for creating a SciENcv account are available here.

 

Q: Sometimes I have trouble with switching back and forth between researchers. Is there a solution for this?

A: Yes, this is a known issue.

 

Q: Is ORCiD commonly used or required by funding agencies?

A: Required for some, encouraged for all

 

Q: Do you have to have ORCiD up and running first before you can use SciENcv?

A: Publications can only be pulled into SciENcv from ORCiD or the “My Bibliography” tool in SciENcv. With My Bibliography, publications can be pulled in from PubMed or manually entered.

 

Q: Is SciENcv still useful if the researcher is not using ORCiD or another repository? Can publications be entered manually?

A: Yes, publications can be entered manually in SciENcv using the “My Bibliography” tool. Publications only need to be manually entered once and will be saved in the profile for future use. However, its recommended that all researchers embrace the use of ORCIDS as a beneficial component of research and scholarly communications. ORCiD is better  than commercial alternatives (Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Scopus) and more likely to endure over the long-term. ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by a global community of member organizations, including research institutions, publishers, funders, professional associations, service providers, and other stakeholders in the research ecosystem.

 

Q: Can publications populate from arXiv?

A: Yes, publications in arXiv can be added to an ORCID record, using the “Add ArXiv ID” function.

 

Q: My researchers use PubMed, but the information entered there isn’t exactly in the format required by sponsors for Biosketches. Will the publications information still get pulled in to SciENcv, and can SciENcv still generate an appropriately formatted Biosketch?

A: Publications are pulled into SciENcv in the exact format as the source. Any citations that are not correctly formatted can be edited using the My Bibliography tool in SciENcv.

 

Q: How does information pull in to SciENcv from ORCiD? What if the PI has hundreds of publications?

A: ORCiD can pull publications information from a number of different database sources, including Crossref, Scopus and Publons (formerly Web of Science). Most publications are already available via one or some of these systems, and they will be available for selection in SciENcv once linked. Also, ORCiD supports automated linkages between the researcher and their articles through integration in manuscript and grant submission workflows, this will eliminate the need to manually add publications moving forward.

 

Q: Can I reorder the citations in the biosketch?

A: Users can reorder the citations as desired by dragging and dropping the citations. The generated PDF will reflect the order displayed on the screen.

 

Q: How is appointment-related information entered in SciENcv? Does it stay there once entered?

A: Appointment-related information is manually entered into SciENcv, but the information stays there for future use. Anyone who is a delegate has the authority to add or update this information. Any appointment-related information entered in ORCID can be transferred into SciENcv.

 

Q: Can I reorder the appointments in my biographical sketch?

A: Professional preparation and appointments must be provided, in reverse chronological order by start date of all the individual's academic, professional, or institutional appointments, beginning with the current appointment.

Users with overlapping or concurrent appointments may need to manually reorder their professional preparation entries by accessing the appointment that should be listed as the current/recent appointment and checking the 'Use this entry as the position title and current employment' checkbox. The generated PDF will reflect the order displayed on the screen.

 

Q: How does creating a Current & Pending document work in SciENcv?

A: The researcher’s current and pending support is entered manually into SciENcv. Thereafter the information is managed by SciENcv. The information stays in the system, and the system will format the Current & Pending document according to sponsor requirements.

 

Q: Does SciENcv support the variety of formats required by sponsors?

A: Yes. SciENcv incorporates new guidance from federal funding agencies and can produce different formats.

 

Q: The Current & Pending document will now require a description of “overlap”. Is there space for this in SciENcv?

A: Yes. As long as you select the correct Current & Pending format when creating the document, this will be an available field.

 

Q: Does SciENcv support the NIH Other Support form?

A: Not at this time, but it is a planned future update.

 

Q: Is it possible to export a Word document from SciENcv?

A: No. The exported PDFs are locked. This is a federal sponsor requirement.

 

Frequently Asked Questions by Researchers

Don't see your question? Email prds@princeton.edu

Q: Why do I need an ORCiD ID?

A: ORCID (Open Researcher & Contributor ID) is an open, non-profit organization that aims to minimize the problem of name ambiguity in scientific communication and to ensure that people get proper credit for all of their research. An ORCID iD protects your scholarly identity by making sure you have a space to collect all of your scholarly works.

ORCID supports many types of “works” from traditional articles to art works and dance performances to datasets and more.

ORCID iDs are used by publishers, funders, associations and other organizations to make sure your work is correctly attributed to you, to unambiguously differentiate you from other scholars with the same name, and to streamline workflows such as submitting and reviewing journal articles, applying for funding and more. 

NIH, AHRQ, and CDC Requirement for ORCID iDs for Individuals Supported by Research Training, Fellowship, Research Education, and Career Development Awards in FY 2020 NOT-OD-19-109. ORCID will also be required for federal funding as per NSPM 33, whose objective to direct  that “research funding agencies shall require the disclosure of information related to potential conflicts of interest and commitment from participants in the Federally funded R&D enterprise.”

 

Q: What is a biosketch?

A: A biographical sketch, or biosketch, is a document highlighting the qualifications of key personnel for a specific role in a proposed grant project. Both the NIH and the NSF require a biosketch for senior or key personnel applying for and renewing grants with each agency.

As of October 1, 2020, NSF has indicated that only PDFs for biographical sketches that are generated through the use of an NSF-approved format will be accepted. Please see NSF's updated memo stating this new requirement. 

Important: You should consult with your research administrator(s) if you have questions about how this will affect your grant submission and deadlines.

 

Q: What is SciENcv?

A: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv) is an electronic system available through the NIH National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Researchers can use SciENcv to create and maintain biosketches for federal grant  grant applications and annual reports. Current agencies that accept  documents from this SciENcv include NIH, NSF, DOE and more to come. SciENcv pulls information from other systems, including ORCIDResearch.gov and eRA commons in order to ease administrative burden and allow researchers to quickly create and recreate a biosketch for each grant application or annual report as required by federal regulations.

 

Q: What is the difference between SciENcv and ORCiD?

A: SciENcv and ORCiD are two distinct tools that can be used together to facilitate the creation of biosketches. SciENcv is a web based tool that helps researchers assemble a CV that complies with sponsor requirements. SciENcv will produce biosketches that are in funder approved formats.

ORCiD essentially acts as a an identity management tool  that provides a persistent, unique identifier and a method of linking research related products such as publications and datasets to a researcher identifier. You can transfer information from ORCiD into SciENcv and use these two systems together to streamline the process of creating biosketches.

 

Q: What resources are available to get started with ORCiD and SciENcv? See links below.

ORCiD

SciENcv