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European Union Documents: Public Opinion

European Union Public Opinion

Eurobarometer Survey Series. 1970+
Large set of surveys measuring public opinion in the countries of the European Union, on a wide variety of topics. Also see the Mannheim Eurobarometer Trend File. Eurobarometer Question and Variable Search allows one to find if and when a topic was covered on the Eurobarometer surveys. Also includes a topical guide. Also see GESIS-ZACATwhich includes a large number of EuroBarometer surveys and others and allows online analysis as well as access to microdatafiles (free registration is required).

European Social Survey (ESS)
Biennial multi-country survey covering over 30 nations. The1st round was fielded in 2002/2003, the 6th in 2012.

Candidate Countries Eurobarometer Survey (2001-2004)
In October 2001, the European Commission launched a new series of surveys in the 13 countries that were applying for European Union membership under the heading Candidate Countries Eurobarometer (CCEB). Initially named Applicant Countries Eurobarometer (or AC-EB) the surveys were ordered and co-ordinated by the Directorate-General for Press and Communication (Public Opinion Analysis). The CCEB surveys were carried out in Bulgaria, Republic of Cyprus (with a separate northern Cyprus survey parallel to 2002.2), Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey. After a 4 year gap the CCEB replaced the former Central and Eastern Eurobarometer.

Central and Eastern Eurobarometer Survey Series (CEEB) (1990-1997)
Began in 1990, when nationally representative surveys were undertaken on behalf of the European Commission in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, and the Soviet Union. Explored individuals' attitudes toward democratic and economic reform, were carried out in the autumn of each year through 1997 in up to 20 countries of the region. An extension of the Eurobarometer series conducted semi-annually in the member nations of the European Union (EU), the Central and Eastern Eurobarometers also focused on public support for the EU and on other issues facing Europe as a whole. After the 1st wave of research, the number of countries was variably expanded to reflect then-current political alignments and realities of access for survey researchers. In each of the countries surveyed, approximately 1,000 persons aged 15 and over were interviewed in their own homes.

Mannheim Eurobarometer Trend File, 1970-2002
Combined the most important trend questions of the Eurobarometer surveys conducted between 1970 and 2002. Consists of 105 trend questions asked at least 5 times in standard Eurobarometer surveys. A total of 1,134,384 respondents from 15 European Union member nations (initially, 6 European Community nations) plus Norway in some years were interviewed in these surveys. The cumulative trend questions concentrated on the respondents' knowledge and opinions of the European Community (EC)/European Union (EU). Respondents were asked for their opinion regarding European unification and whether or not they were satisfied with the speed of regional integration. Respondents were also asked to describe their sentiments with respect to citizenship and whether they identified themselves more as a citizen of their home country or as a citizen of Europe. Also asked questions regarding EC/EU institutions such as the European Parliament (EP), the European Commission, the European Court of Justice, and the European Central Bank, among others. Respondents were asked whether they had heard about EC/EU institutions, the importance of these institutions, and whether or not they believed these institutions to be trustworthy. Addressed several other issues of economy, society, and polity including the overall state of the economy in the EU and its individual member states, the respondents' overall satisfaction with their lives, whether certain policy decisions should be made at the EU or national level, the importance of European Parliamentary elections, recent voting behavior, voter intentions, party preferences, whether respondents discussed political matters, whether they attempted to persuade others close to them to share their views on subjects they held strong opinions about, and how they viewed the need for societal change. Respondents were asked how closely they followed various news and by which media they received the news, how much they supported different types of political and social movements, and what they believed was the probability of strikes and world war in the next 10 years. Demographic and other background information collected included the respondents' age, gender, and marital status, the number of people residing in the household, the number of children under 15 in the household, respondent's age at completion of education, left-right political self-placement, occupation, religion, subjective social class, political party affiliation, trade union membership, household income, region of residence, and subjective size of community.